Innovate, Don’t Ape – How to Survive the Recession

apeThirty years ago, according to a recent article in the Economist, the bosses of America’s car industry were shocked to discover that Japan had overtaken them to become the largest car manufacturers on the planet. The bosses blamed this success on cheap labour and government subsidies.

But the progressive bosses went to Japan and discovered that Honda and Toyota had raced ahead of them by virtue of a combination of innovation and inspiration. The American manufacturers quickly dubbed the methods of production “lean manufacturing”. This approach to manufacturing was in fact an American idea that was fully developed in Japan and ignored in America. The inspiration was to listen to customers who – echoing today’s demands- were looking for cars that were cheap on gas but still a quality product.

The moral of the story is that if Japan had merely aped American car manufacturers, their car industry would not have thrived. Today’s emerging economies are growing in part on cheap labour but mostly because they have innovated faster than rich countries. Kenya, for example, is the world leader in money-transfer by cell phone. Frugal innovation in the emerging world has created the $3000 car and the $300 laptop. These products were re-designed to eliminate costly steps in the manufacturing process.

The lesson for today’s businesses is an old one. Innovate don’t ape. If everyone else is offering sale priced goods on senior’s Tuesdays, and they are not making any money, why would you want to copy them? If everyone else offers the same burgers, the same landscaping service, the same financial solutions, the same furniture, then, to compete you must drop your prices in order to gain customers.

 In a conversation last week with a manufacturer in Vancouver, the owner told me that his approach during this recession had been a total reversal of the approach in the recession 10 years ago. A decade ago, the company chose to ride the storm and drop prices. This time they cut costs and left prices intact. The result: fewer sales but more cash in the bank.

 So, the question is how to innovate. Can you make your product or service better in some way than is currently offered? Will the change be a gimmick and easily copied by your competitors or can you offer something your competitors cannot?

 Overwhelmed by the thought of what to do? Do you think your business has no room to innovate? Consider this. Water and flour are commodities traded on the world markets on price alone. When mixed together, they ought to produce another commodity. However, this product has over 1000 market niches with prices that reflect not the cost of materials or the taste of this food product, but the shape of the food. I am speaking, of course, about pasta.

This is brilliant marketing to create a market based upon the shape of a food product while everyone else focused on flavour or fast food.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *