The Price of Money – a Lender Perspective.

Bag-of-MoneyMoney is not a commodity. By definition, a commodity is a generic product that is bought and sold on price alone. Money, Canadian bills for example, look the same, smell somewhat the same, and are available country wide. But, when you want to borrow money, rent the money in fact, the price for that money is not at all consistent.

Why does the price of money fluctuate from person to person? Why do some people borrow at prime minus rates and some at 18%? It is because, in part, that your lender does a risk assessment of you and your circumstances that affects what they will charge. Let’s look at this from the point of view of a mortgage for your home.

The first consideration is location. If your home is 100 kilometres from the nearest small town of  4000 people, you might not get a mortgage at all, but if you do, the lender will add risk factors. If you default, will anybody buy the property and redeem the mortgage? Your Shangri-La is perhaps too unique to attract a buyer.

Then there is the home price bracket to consider. A home priced to sell in a hot price bracket is easier to mortgage than a million dollar home. There are simply more buyers who equate to an easier exit from the loan in the event of default.

Then there is the loan to value calculation. A high ratio means only that you do not have enough “skin” in the game and if things get overwhelming it is too easy for you to walk away, leaving the lender with your house. A higher loan to value ratio simply means you will pay a higher interest rate or have to give up your first born child.

Then there is your employment. Self-employed or just started a new job? You will pay more for your money. That is because the risk of not being employed or having too little money coming in to service the mortgage is higher than having a nice steady government job.

Then there is your credit report. Credit is something to be managed. Keeping your record clean and current shows that you are fastidious about paying your obligations. Having a low score means you are a deadbeat.

All of the above explains why some people pay 2.5% and some 15% on their mortgages. It is, in part, a reflection of the supply and demand function.

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