The Price of Money – a Lender Perspective.

Bag-of-MoneyMoney is not a commodity. By definition, a commodity is a generic product that is bought and sold on price alone. Money, Canadian bills for example, look the same, smell somewhat the same, and are available country wide. But, when you want to borrow money, rent the money in fact, the price for that money is not at all consistent.

Why does the price of money fluctuate from person to person? Why do some people borrow at prime minus rates and some at 18%? It is because, in part, that your lender does a risk assessment of you and your circumstances that affects what they will charge. Let’s look at this from the point of view of a mortgage for your home.

The first consideration is location. If your home is 100 kilometres from the nearest small town of  4000 people, you might not get a mortgage at all, but if you do, the lender will add risk factors. If you default, will anybody buy the property and redeem the mortgage? Your Shangri-La is perhaps too unique to attract a buyer.

Then there is the home price bracket to consider. A home priced to sell in a hot price bracket is easier to mortgage than a million dollar home. There are simply more buyers who equate to an easier exit from the loan in the event of default.

Then there is the loan to value calculation. A high ratio means only that you do not have enough “skin” in the game and if things get overwhelming it is too easy for you to walk away, leaving the lender with your house. A higher loan to value ratio simply means you will pay a higher interest rate or have to give up your first born child.

Then there is your employment. Self-employed or just started a new job? You will pay more for your money. That is because the risk of not being employed or having too little money coming in to service the mortgage is higher than having a nice steady government job.

Then there is your credit report. Credit is something to be managed. Keeping your record clean and current shows that you are fastidious about paying your obligations. Having a low score means you are a deadbeat.

All of the above explains why some people pay 2.5% and some 15% on their mortgages. It is, in part, a reflection of the supply and demand function.

WHY DON’T SCHOOLS TEACH BUSINESS HOPEFULS TO USE CASH FLOW TOOLS?

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Imagine a business, if you would, that shows decent margins, low debt, and slowly growing sales. Bankers examine the financial statements declare that the company is in good shape. “Carry on and keep up the good work,” they say. But … Continue reading

6 easy steps to emptying your business wallet

In the early 1980’s, when I began operational work with businesses, there was a conventional attitude to inventory control. This wisdom measured inventory control by looking at the relative cost of money and the interest charged against having that inventory on the shelf. That attitude saw the creation of robust ERP systems to help managers like me.

Because the recent price of money is so cheap, that business calculation has taken a knock; but the curtain is now drawn back revealing another way to measure the effectiveness of inventory control.

Consider that you have $10,000 per year with which to purchase housewares inventory. And let us suppose that 90% of that inventory sells during the year. At the end of the year 10% of the original $10,000 is still on the shelf. $1000. Theoretically, that means that in the coming year, only $9000 is available to purchase inventory. At the end of that year, assuming 90% sells, the will be $1900 worth of unsold inventory on the shelves. It does not take long to realise that all the cash will shortly be locked up in unsold inventory. The table and chart show how that works.

The result will be, of course, that the company finds itself less and less able to purchase new goods. There may not even be the room on the shelves or in the warehouse to store more purchases. From the customer point of view, the company will be stuffed with dust covered inventory. The company has ground to a halt.

If the dead inventory is converted to cash at even 20 cents on the dollar, you can use that cash to buy goods that will sell and buildup the cash available for further purchases.

Does this ever happen in real life? Yes is the simple answer. A decade ago, the company I managed had $600,000 of inventory of which 30% had no sales in 6 years. This strapped the company for cash. There were items on the shelf due to ordering errors and for which there was not even a market for more than 150 miles.

Recently, an office furniture company called me about their cash problems. They badly needed $100,000. But in their showroom and warehouse they had inventory totalling almost double that. The solution was to have a huge sale and convert everything to cash.

Remember that cash is king and being without it leaves you at the mercy of creditors, suppliers, and landlords. With cash, you have a chance. Even selling goods below cost and converting those goods to cash is better than sitting on mountains of unsold inventory. 

Written by Andrew Gregson, Senior Partner at Floodlight Business Solutions and author of Pricing Strategies for Small Business (2008).  1-888-959-0752  www.floodlight.ca. Floodlight Business Solutions, where we help you drive profits.

 

Exiting your Business with a Barrelful of Money

 

How to Super-Size the Cheque the Buyer will give you.

With the baby boomers reaching retirement age, a large number of companies will likely change hands in the coming years. Right now, 20% of small businesses are for sale. Within 10 years that percentage will double to 40% and within 15 years that number will rise again to 70%. Kelowna and the Okanagan, being an older demographic are at least 5 years ahead of that supply curve.

soldWhat will be the fate of small businesses when the owners retire?

According to TD Waterhouse’s early October Business Succession Poll of 609 small business owners, only 24 per cent of small business owners surveyed said they had a succession plan worked out for retirement.

Of those polled, whether they had a formal plan or not, 23 per cent said they would simply close their business when it came time to retire; 20 per cent planned to sell their business to a third party; 18 per cent expected to transfer it to a family member; 12 per cent said they’d sell to a partner or employee; and 27 per cent said they were not yet sure what they’d do with their business.

td waterhouse survey

 

 

 

 

And what will be the likely impact on personal wealth?

When you sell to a family member or employee, there are typically fewer dollars on the table, because the company will be heavily discounted.

Closing the doors means zero return for years of business building.

The people answering “not sure” are likely faced with a Freedom 85 Plan, wherein the owner works until he/she can no longer work- and not by choice.

Of course, if the owners salted money away and used the cash flow diligently to build personal assets, then the owners may have enough for a comfortable retirement, allowing them simply to close the doors.

This article, however, is about those who are relying on the sale of their business to fund their retirement and how to find the retirement money they need.

Simple economics dictate that in forthcoming years, supply will exceed demand and many companies will just be left on the shelf as buyers cherry pick the best. But since the beginning of the recession in 2008 many businesses have faced falling sales and increasing debt. This situation has eroded value in many businesses.

So how can an owner stand out from the rest in a crowded bidding war for a buyer? What will buyers pay top dollar for? Investors look for a return on their investment and will not buy indebted companies with falling market share and paper thin margins. Most of all, they will not buy a business that depends entirely upon the owner to make it work.

  1. Is there good return on equity – today, not some hypothetical future?
  2. Does the company have high profit margins?
  3. What fixable factors mean that the business will be purchased at a significant discount to its value?
  4. Are there systems in place for the owner not to have to work 12 hours per day?
  5. What factors will help a buyer get financing from his financial Institution?

If an owner answers NO to any of these questions, then something needs to be done, starting today.

What to do?

  1. Pay for a third party valuation and ask what factors are holding back the value.
  2. Pay down debt, starting with the most dangerous debts
  3. Build tangible assets that hold their value and are essential to the business
  4. Increase profits and cash flow with a better pricing strategy
  5. Increase sales with a modern marketing plan
  6. Create a credible exit plan that identifies to whom you will sell the company and at what price and when.
  7. Talk to a good accountant about the tax implications of your plan
  8. Build a solid 3 year plan to make this happen
  9. Work the plan
  10. Do something, do anything. Remember that even a dead fish can float downstream.

By Andrew Gregson, Senior Partner at Floodlight Business Solutions LLP, a consultancy focusing on rebuilding sales, rebuilding finances and creating value. call today if you need a guest speaker on this topic www.floodlight.ca.

Email: agregson@floodlight.ca                        Ph: 888-959-0752

5 keys to profitability – part 1

keysA profitable business is a saleable business. A profitable business is easier to manage and to operate. Everyone loves to do business with probable businesses because they all know the invoices will get paid. The best employees want to work for profitable companies because they know their paycheques will not bounce or get delayed.

Profit is the reason entrepreneurs get into business in the first instance; but how to keep a company profitable is sometimes a trial. Here is how, with the first of our 5 keys to profitability.

Attention to cash flow

Most business owners focus on price and margins forgetting an important element in running a successful business – cash flow. What does this mean and how does it work?

Let us consider for a moment that you are selling loose tea. You pay 1 dollar per kilo for the tea. You sell the tea for $1.50 per kilo giving you a margin of 33%. Monthly you can sell 100 kilos to 100 different customers. So every time you sell one kilo of tea you profit by 50 cents.

At $1.50 per kilo you can sell 100 kilos per month but experiments have shown that by dropping the price to $1.29 per kilo you sell 150 kilos per month to 150 different customers. That generates a margin of 22%.  So every time you sell one kilo of tea you profit by 29 cents.

Most business owners will focus on sales and price believing that dropping the price will increase sales and the sun will shine. But will that reasoning help your profits?

In the first example the cash flow is $50 per month. In the second the cash flow is $43.50. So dropping the price and selling even more tea has damaged the bottom line. In terms of cash flow, increasing the sales with a lower price has not been a good decision.

But if you focus on the cash flow figure, you can also improve profits, as follows. Suppose that you are now selling tea for the sale price of $1.29 per kilo. But instead of selling one kilo at a time, now the buyer must buy a minimum  of 2 kilos. As before, 150 customers come in and buy tea and the margin remains the same at 29 cents per kilo. But this time the contribution to the bottom line is $87. And you did not have to work any harder for that profit.

What this example tells us, is to focus on the dollar contribution and not margins or even the price. Dollars pay the rent, employees and taxes.

Written by Andrew Gregson, Senior Partner at Floodlight Business Solutions and author of Pricing Strategies for Small Business (2008).  1-888-959-0752  www.floodlight.ca. Floodlight Business Solutions, where we help you drive profits.