The Price of Money – a Lender Perspective.

Bag-of-MoneyMoney is not a commodity. By definition, a commodity is a generic product that is bought and sold on price alone. Money, Canadian bills for example, look the same, smell somewhat the same, and are available country wide. But, when you want to borrow money, rent the money in fact, the price for that money is not at all consistent.

Why does the price of money fluctuate from person to person? Why do some people borrow at prime minus rates and some at 18%? It is because, in part, that your lender does a risk assessment of you and your circumstances that affects what they will charge. Let’s look at this from the point of view of a mortgage for your home.

The first consideration is location. If your home is 100 kilometres from the nearest small town of  4000 people, you might not get a mortgage at all, but if you do, the lender will add risk factors. If you default, will anybody buy the property and redeem the mortgage? Your Shangri-La is perhaps too unique to attract a buyer.

Then there is the home price bracket to consider. A home priced to sell in a hot price bracket is easier to mortgage than a million dollar home. There are simply more buyers who equate to an easier exit from the loan in the event of default.

Then there is the loan to value calculation. A high ratio means only that you do not have enough “skin” in the game and if things get overwhelming it is too easy for you to walk away, leaving the lender with your house. A higher loan to value ratio simply means you will pay a higher interest rate or have to give up your first born child.

Then there is your employment. Self-employed or just started a new job? You will pay more for your money. That is because the risk of not being employed or having too little money coming in to service the mortgage is higher than having a nice steady government job.

Then there is your credit report. Credit is something to be managed. Keeping your record clean and current shows that you are fastidious about paying your obligations. Having a low score means you are a deadbeat.

All of the above explains why some people pay 2.5% and some 15% on their mortgages. It is, in part, a reflection of the supply and demand function.

At the Core: Lessons in Pricing from Apple.

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Apple has taught many entrepreneurs the importance of design, how to create buzz when introducing new products to the marketplace, how to pioneer new technology and the importance of superior quality.

But Apple also has wily pricing experts who have used pricing strategies to create extra profits.

The most recent example is the Apple response to Samsung’s huge presence in the India market. Apple’s products are too pricey for the average Indian, where many people still survive on $2 per day. Smart phones make sense in countries where electricity supplies and telecoms infrastructure is weak and prone to frequent blackouts. Phones add value to people’s lives by bringing them close to the markets. This has already happened in some poor fishing communities that dot the coastline. When heading back with the catch of the day, they can check the spot prices at various ports within reach and choose the best paying one. Clearly smart phones are an economic accelerator. So, how to get more smart phones into Indian hands?

Apple has used a price skimming strategy for the consumer market. Early adopters pay greatly for the newest and brightest toys. But Apple also knows that competitors can enter the market easily and quickly after Apple has pioneered the technology. So constant innovation is a hallmark of Apple products.

But that means the earliest smart phones are soon obsolete. Apple could NOT “dump” the old phones on the American or early adopter market, for fear of cannibalising its own consumer segment. So Apple took the older phones to India, effectively buying market share with a great if outdated product that has already generated all the profits Apple expected.

But not all of us have the luxury of dumping our old products on a foreign market. How can Apple’s leadership in this pricing gambit be put to use in a Canadian small business?

If your pricing model demands a profit margin on each and every inventory item you sell, you will not be able to sell the end of season or dust covered items for a dollar. You will lose money.

But Apple has a simple idea. Not all inventory moves equally. If you sell seasonal or fashion products, some product will be left over after the majority has sold. If your pricing model allowed for this hangover – check your records in prior years -, then you could sell the leftovers for $1 and make a profit.  See my prior articles on how the big box stores price this way or take a look at my book , Pricing Strategies for Small Business. If you sell strategically, you can gain new clientele. By contacting your customer list and advising of a tremendous sale, you move inventory that would otherwise gather dust and gain loyal customers at the same time.

Contact Andrew Gregson for your next convention, conference or workshop.

 

WHY DON’T SCHOOLS TEACH BUSINESS HOPEFULS TO USE CASH FLOW TOOLS?

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Imagine a business, if you would, that shows decent margins, low debt, and slowly growing sales. Bankers examine the financial statements declare that the company is in good shape. “Carry on and keep up the good work,” they say. But … Continue reading

Results Based Pricing for Professionals

I have just read an article from November of 2013 (Managing Partner, published in New Zealand) about pricing for professionals. When surveyed about how they charge, most professionals shrug and admit that they charge what everyone else charges. It has reminded me to put value and choice at the very top of the list of how to devise winning pricing strategy that will increase profits.

shrugPricing professional services is a big problem for lawyers, accountants and anyone selling services. Professionals deal in results, but they charge for effort. The easy route is to charge by the hour but that makes it easy for a potential client to compare apples to apples. AB charges $125 per hour. BC charges $250 per hour. Therefore, AB is the best buy. But is that true?

So, would you buy a house based solely on price? House F is small, rundown, needs a roof and is in the middle of a rough neighborhood. It is listed for $229,000. House G is much larger and in a nice neighbourhood. It is occupancy ready and most importantly, your wife likes it. But its list price is $400,000. Which house has value?

In order to place value on a service for hire, the trick is to comprehend that the customer does not care about the amount of time, effort and sweat you expend. They want results. And what is the result they want? Do you ever ask? Where will the customer place the most value? Speed of service? Accuracy? No jail time? Or will  they respect the weekends you spent on their file, the late nights and the cost of years of schooling?

So we establish, state and then highlight the value on the table, first, right? But now what?

In order to get your price, though, you must offer choice. Like Goldilocks , the choices must be few- not too high, not too low and just right. Choice in pricing will allow you to take clients and customers with all kinds of budgets and thickness of wallet, without discounting. The platinum package will have the largest assortment of bells and whistles. The gold package has fewer bells and only one whistle but has a lower price tag. The workmanship is still present, but the results are fewer. The bronze package is the budget offering with the lowest price and the fewest bells and no whistles at all.

Want to be more profitable? Be brave and get a better pricing strategy.

5 keys to profitability – part 1

keysA profitable business is a saleable business. A profitable business is easier to manage and to operate. Everyone loves to do business with probable businesses because they all know the invoices will get paid. The best employees want to work for profitable companies because they know their paycheques will not bounce or get delayed.

Profit is the reason entrepreneurs get into business in the first instance; but how to keep a company profitable is sometimes a trial. Here is how, with the first of our 5 keys to profitability.

Attention to cash flow

Most business owners focus on price and margins forgetting an important element in running a successful business – cash flow. What does this mean and how does it work?

Let us consider for a moment that you are selling loose tea. You pay 1 dollar per kilo for the tea. You sell the tea for $1.50 per kilo giving you a margin of 33%. Monthly you can sell 100 kilos to 100 different customers. So every time you sell one kilo of tea you profit by 50 cents.

At $1.50 per kilo you can sell 100 kilos per month but experiments have shown that by dropping the price to $1.29 per kilo you sell 150 kilos per month to 150 different customers. That generates a margin of 22%.  So every time you sell one kilo of tea you profit by 29 cents.

Most business owners will focus on sales and price believing that dropping the price will increase sales and the sun will shine. But will that reasoning help your profits?

In the first example the cash flow is $50 per month. In the second the cash flow is $43.50. So dropping the price and selling even more tea has damaged the bottom line. In terms of cash flow, increasing the sales with a lower price has not been a good decision.

But if you focus on the cash flow figure, you can also improve profits, as follows. Suppose that you are now selling tea for the sale price of $1.29 per kilo. But instead of selling one kilo at a time, now the buyer must buy a minimum  of 2 kilos. As before, 150 customers come in and buy tea and the margin remains the same at 29 cents per kilo. But this time the contribution to the bottom line is $87. And you did not have to work any harder for that profit.

What this example tells us, is to focus on the dollar contribution and not margins or even the price. Dollars pay the rent, employees and taxes.

Written by Andrew Gregson, Senior Partner at Floodlight Business Solutions and author of Pricing Strategies for Small Business (2008).  1-888-959-0752  www.floodlight.ca. Floodlight Business Solutions, where we help you drive profits.